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Some herbs are known to react with your medication. Please consult your physician before starting on any herb.

CARAWAY   CARUM CARVI
 

Family: Umbelliferae

---Synonym---Caraway Seed.
---Part Used---Fruit.
 

The seeds contain from 4 to 7 per cent of volatile oil.

The exhausted seed, after the distillation of the oil, contains a high percentage of protein and fat, and is used as a cattle food.

---Medicinal Action and Uses---Both fruit and oil possess aromatic, stimulant and carminative properties. Caraway was widely employed at one time as a carminative cordial, and was recommended in dyspepsia and symptoms attending hysteria and other disorders. It possesses some tonic property and forms a pleasant stomachic. Its former extensive employment in medicine has much decreased in recent years, and the oil and fruit are now principally employed as adjuncts to other medicines as corrective or flavouring agents, combined with purgatives.

Distilled Caraway water is considered a useful remedy in the flatulent colic of infants, and is an excellent vehicle for children's medicine. When sweetened, its flavour is agreeable.

The bruised seeds, pounded with the crumb of a hot new loaf and a little spirit to moisten, was an old-fashioned remedy for bad earache. The powder of the seeds, made into a poultice, will also take away bruises.

Carduus
Benedictus

Chamomile Caraway Calamint Calendula Celandine  Chives Centaury
Chervil Chickweed Cinquefoil

Clary

Clown's Woundwort

Club moss

Colt's foot Cornsilk
Cowslip Crosswort Cudweed Cucumber

Chestnut Tree

Wild Carrot

Chicory

 Cedar (Siberian)