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Some herbs are known to react with your medication. Please consult your physician before starting on any herb.

Feverfew  Tanacetum parthenium

Family: Compositae

---Synonyms---

Chrysanthemum parthenium (L), Leucanthemum parthenium, Pyrethrum parthenium, Tanacete parthenii herba or folium, Featherfew, Featherfoil, Midsummer daisy, Bachelorís buttons, Altamisa, nosebleed, flirtwort

Parts used: Leaves

Active Compounds:  sesquiterpene lactones (including parthenolide and santamarine), volatile oil, sesquiterpenes (including camphor, farnesene and germacrene), tannins, monoterpenes
--Medicinal Action and Uses--- 

Actions: migraine prophylactic, anti-inflammatory, vasodilatory, antirheumatic, febrifuge, digestive bitter, anthelmintic, uterine stimulant

Indications: Migraine prophylaxis, arthritic conditions

Although this herb has long been used in migraine prophylaxis, confirmed by clinical studies, the precise mechanism of the action is not yet fully understood. It is thought that the prophylactic action is due to serotonin (5-HT) inhibition, possibly via the neutralisation of sulphydryl groups on specific enzymes that are fundamental to platelet aggregation and secretion. Abnormal platelet behaviour with the release of 5-HT has been implicated in migraine. Parthenolide also interferes with both the contractile and relaxant mechanisms in blood vessels. Many of the patients involved in the clinical trials for migraine prophylaxis also reported that feverfew helped their depression. It helps ease tinnitus and dizziness, and allays nausea and vomiting. 

Feverfew  has long been reputed to help relieve arthritis, particularly in the painful active inflammatory stage. The sesquiterpene lactones, and particularly parthenolide, have been shown to inhibit human blood platelet aggregation and secretory activity in platelets and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (increased secretion is a feature of rheumatoid arthritis). However, a double-blind, placebo-controlled study over six weeks on 40 females with rheumatoid arthritis showed no beneficial effects. 

Feverfew  has been used in the treatment of dysmenorrhoea and sluggish menstrual flow, and an infusion may be taken to cleanse the uterus after childbirth. Antimicrobial properties against Gram-positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi in vitro have been documented for parthenolide; Gram-negative bacteria were not affected.

Although this herb has long been used in migraine prophylaxis, confirmed by clinical studies, the precise mechanism of the action is not yet fully understood. It is thought that the prophylactic action is due to serotonin (5-HT) inhibition, possibly via the neutralisation of sulphydryl groups on specific enzymes that are fundamental to platelet aggregation and secretion. Abnormal platelet behaviour with the release of 5-HT has been implicated in migraine. Parthenolide also interferes with both the contractile and relaxant mechanisms in blood vessels. Many of the patients involved in the clinical trials for migraine prophylaxis also reported that feverfew helped their depression. It helps ease tinnitus and dizziness, and allays nausea and vomiting. 

Feverfew has long been reputed to help relieve arthritis, particularly in the painful active inflammatory stage. The sesquiterpene lactones, and particularly parthenolide, have been shown to inhibit human blood platelet aggregation and secretory activity in platelets and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (increased secretion is a feature of rheumatoid arthritis). However, a double-blind, placebo-controlled study over six weeks on 40 females with rheumatoid arthritis showed no beneficial effects. 

Feverfew has been used in the treatment of dysmenorrhoea and sluggish menstrual flow, and an infusion may be taken to cleanse the uterus after childbirth. Antimicrobial properties against Gram-positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi in vitro have been documented for parthenolide; Gram-negative bacteria were not affected.

Caution: The fresh leaves can cause mouth ulceration or gastric disturbance so it is recommended that those taking the fresh leaf for migraine prophylaxis should take it with some bread. Contact allergy is rare. The herb is contraindicated in pregnancy due to its stimulating action on the uterus.

Fennel Feverfew Figwort Five-finger grass Fleur-de-lis Fumitory